Skip to content

Accident investigation resources

Accident investigation guidance

​​​​​​​RSSB's three-part accident investigation guide applies to a wide range of safety events, including accidents, incidents and near misses, and extends beyond the operations-focussed requirements of Railway Group Standard GO/RT3119 Accident and Incident Investigation External link and its associated Guidance Note External link.  The 3-part guides are available on the Accident investigation guidance page.

The Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents External link produces a ten point prompt list External link to help investigators check their own processes, while the Health & Safety Executive External link produces a
guide to investigating accidents and incidents (including near misses) External link.

Improvements in train accident risk

​In addition to ​annual reports, RSSB produced a report on improvements in train accidents in 2009. This summarised the overall reduction in risk to passengers and staff from train accidents in the ten years up to October 2009, the associated improvements in engineering and safety, and the industry positions which supported this state. 

Incident Factor Classification System

The Incident Factor Classification System is a module of SMIS that allows the conclusions from RAIB and non-RAIB accident investigation reports to be grouped and analysed.

The aim is to support industry in reducing recurrence by looking at common causes and seeking solutions which may be transferred from other areas and even – in time – other industries.

Background

From 2002 until RAIB External link became fully operational in 2006, RSSB (and its predecessor Railway Safety) was responsible for extracting lessons from accidents by investigating their causes.

The resulting reports made recommendations to industry parties to help stop similar accidents happening again. These parties were required to consider the recommendations and take appropriate action.

RSSB Formal Inquiry reports and summaries

Though the cycle of safety planning and performance reporting it is essential to ensure that safety continues to improve. Much of the industry's learning comes from investigations into accidents and incidents.

The more significant accidents (involving loss of life or potentially significant consequences) are investigated by the Office of Rail and Road (ORR) as safety authority, and the Rail Accident Investigation Branch (RAIB).

From 2002 until RAIB became fully operational in 2006, RSSB (and its predecessor Railway Safety) was responsible for extracting lessons from accidents by investigating their causes.

RSSB's Formal Inquiry recommendation and full reports

Formal inquiry recommendation reports from 2003-2005 can be found on SPARK.

RSSB's formal inquiry full reports are also available on SPARK External link to RSSB members only.

This document is hosted on SPARK

SPARK

You are now being redirected to SPARK, RSSB's knowledge sharing hub, to access the requested information.

Your RSSB user name and password can be used to access SPARK.

Ok